Posts Tagged ‘Andover Historical Society’

Games Week 10

Sunday, February 1st, 2015
1987.477.1abc

1987.477.1abc

This the final post I will be making that has to do with cards. These objects are simply three individual cards from a pack. These cards are all miniscule, and the back of each is a simple blue design.  The three individual cards, as shown, are the 2 of diamonds, the 6 of diamonds, and the 4 of hearts. The donor of these three specific cards is unknown, as is the date they were made and obtained. Despite the little information and the uncertainty of these objects, they are somewhat interesting in that they are just three individual cards. This is unlike any other object on the third floor of the Andover Historical Society, and despite the simplicity, they merit some attention.

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Games Week 9

Monday, January 26th, 2015
1997.123.1

1992.031.1

This is an object that is truly unique to the town of Andover, the game of Andover, Massachusetts. This board game, along with others, was found on the third floor of the historical society. This game is essentially Monopoly, but “Andover-ized.” One can see the gazebo and the Phillips Academy bell tower on the cover of the game, showing locations that could have served as properties in the game. 2014-07-23 14.44.56As one could read from the rules, this game is, what I stated before, a spin-off of Monopoly. Each player starts with a certain amount of cash, then moves around the board using game pieces to buy properties and pay/collect cash to and from the bank. The game only ends when all but one player becomes bankrupt, which can often take hours. 2014-07-23 14.44.24This is the game board, with the “Go” square in the corner where one starts the game. The multiple properties are spread out on the board, as are the Andover version of “Go to Jail,” and various fees and “star” cards, or chance cards in regular Monopoly. The same image on the cover is on the middle of the board. 2014-07-23 14.46.10The game pieces, dice, star cards, cash, and property cards are all located within the game box. These objects are all similar to Monopoly, even though the game pieces are significantly less original in this game. In conclusion, this game is truly unique in that it incorporates the town into a simple board game everyone can play.

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Games Week 8

Monday, January 19th, 2015
1994.002.1

1994.002.1

This is yet another deck of cards found on the third floor of the Andover Historical Society. This deck may look familiar, as it contains the image of the Merrimack Mutual Fire Insurance Company on the front. The Merrimack Mutual Fire Insurance Company, as stated back in my blog post during Week 3, is the founder of Andover Companies, which is an insurance based company. This specific deck is similar to the last deck, but actually contains a three of clubs.

By observing the flap on the card box, one can see that the box was part of the Remembrance Playing Cards series, and the back of the card box shows the Redi-Slip finish. A common theme among these old card decks is the Redi-Slip Finish, suggesting that the card decks are all made through similar means. However, aside from the donor of this deck, the Merrimack Mutual Fire Insurance Company, not much is known about it.

Redi-Slip Finish

Redi-Slip Finish

Examples of Cards

Examples of Cards

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Games Week 7

Monday, January 12th, 2015
1996.056.3

1996.056.3

This board is of a game known as the “Uncle Wiggly Game.” This board game was found with other games on the third floor of the historical society. Although the box is just a red cover with a sticker label in the corner, the game board is far more interesting. Unfortunately, the donor of this game is unknown, but this game was used by the donor’s daughter.

Game board

Game board

This is the game board, which is thoroughly detailed with images and the paths players would take with game pieces. This game appears to be a classic board game where the objective is to traverse from one location to another. 2014-07-23 14.42.37These are the game pieces and cards that go along with the game. 2014-07-23 14.41.27

These are the rules for the game in case there are any readers out there who wish to know what the game is truly about, as the title and game itself are somewhat vague.

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Games Week 6

Monday, January 5th, 2015
1993.014.1

1993.014.1

This is another of the many deck of cards on the Andover Historical Society third floor. This is another standard deck, with all 52 cards plus jokers. However, the card box is different in that it shows the etching of Memorial Gate, with Abbot Hall in the background. The image is a representation of Abbot Academy. The other side of the box is of the Redi-Slip finish, signifying that this deck of cards is of the Redi-Slip type.

This specific deck of cards were made by the company Brown and Bigelow. The Brown and Bigelow company was known for making Redi-Slip cards, which in this case, were also known as Remembrance Playing Cards. Brown and Bigelow was founded in 1896, and still exists today. The company’s aim is to sell promotional products throughout the country through sales executives.

2014-07-23 14.38.40

Examples of some cards

2014-07-23 14.37.49

The Redi-Slip Finish

     This deck was donated from the estate of Margaret Batter Sill, located in Methuen, MA. The card deck, however, was made in St. Paul, Minnesota.

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Games Week 5

Monday, December 29th, 2014
1985.264.1a-h

1985.264.1a-h

Taking a break from the deck of cards, this particular game is called the “Fish pond game.” It was also found on the third floor of the Andover Historical Society. The game comes in a long rectangular wooden box, and on the inside lid is a white label with the rules of the game. The box lid connects to the box using hinges and a small latch.

Rules of the Game

Rules of the Game

2014-07-23 14.34.13

A “fishing pole” and “fish.”

In the box, are six fishing poles, or 45 centimeter long dowels, and 37 “fish,” or small wooden-bell shaped pieces with wood bubbles at the top of each piece simulating the eyes of the fish. This game is somewhat abstract and unknown, but simulates the art of fishing. Unfortunately, the donor is unknown as well as the year of conception.

 

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Games Week 4

Monday, December 22nd, 2014
2005.013.2

2005.013.2

This is another one of the abundant supply of card decks on the third floor. This deck of cards, similarly to last week’s entry, was donated by the Merrimack Mutual Fire Insurance Company. These cards were also produced in the mid 1900s. The difference between the card decks is the design on the cover. Whereas the last deck contained a simple, inconspicuous design, this deck has the image of a Native American woman in front of a tepee plastered on the front of the deck and the front of each card. Unlike the other deck of cards, this deck contains the full set of 52 cards in a standard deck, as well as four jokers.

This deck of cards contains a distinguishable box lid, bottom, and the actual deck of cards. These are labelled as three different objects with different ID’s. Inside the lid, there is a note about the maker of the cards, Ray Ring. He lived in Epsom, New Hampshire, and worked for Forbes and other companies in the mid 1900s.

2014-07-23 14.24.09This is the full suite of clubs with the joker, next to the open box of cards.

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Games Weeks 3

Monday, December 15th, 2014
2014-07-23 14.25.42

2003.050.1ab

This old deck of cards is one of many located on the third floor of the Andover Historical Society. This deck is a standard deck of cards, with the exception being the three of clubs missing. Aside from this, the other 51 cards are included in this deck. The card box has two sides, one of which is shown. The other side is labelled Merrimack Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and this is the label for the back of each card as well.

The Merrimack Mutual Fire Insurance Company was formed in 1828, and is the founder of Andover companies, an insurance protection agency since 1828. It is one of three companies, that still exist today, of Andover companies. The Merrimack Mutual Fire Insurance Company sold policies to several towns, including Andover, Newbury, Beverly, Methuen, and Newburyport. The company was successful initially, and currently owns more than half of Andover companies. The current address for this company is 95 Old River Road, residing close to Lawrence.

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Games Week 2

Monday, December 8th, 2014

 

1976.024.117

1976.024.117

This is a circular board found on the third floor of the Andover Historical Society. This game is similar to the last one, but has a varying setup as well as varying rules. This board contains 33 holes for marbles, and included in the game set, are 32 marbles.

This game is called peg solitaire, with the intial setup having marbles in each hole aside from the center one. Then, a player must jump one marble over an adjacent one. A marble jumped over is to be removed from the board. However, there must be a space open for the marble jumping over the other marble for this to occur. The game continues until it is impossible to remove any more marbles, or if, in rare cases, there is only one marble left, which is the goal of the game.

This board can also be used for other games requiring marbles as well, and is versatile in that facet. These are the marbles that would be used in the game.

The marbles of the game

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Games Week 1

Monday, December 1st, 2014
1948.106.1

1948.106.1

The image above is of a child’s game that was found in the Northeast wing of the third floor of the Andover Historical Society. This is the first of a series of blog posts I will be doing about the upcoming Making Time to Play exhibit.

This particular game involves an octagonal wooden board, as shown, with two oval tracks cut into it near the edges of the board. There is one straight track in the center. There are also twenty wooden disks with letters painted on them to slide along the tracks. Some of these disks are broken, but are still able to slide through the tracks. The exact name and rules of this game are unknown, as is the manufacturer and donor. However, it can be inferred that the disks are meant to be arranged in some way.

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